Blog #4

Identify the six Toulmin components in the Kissling piece. Provide at least three direct quotations as you demonstrate these components.

14 thoughts on “Blog #4”

  1. Kissling, in her essay entitled “I don’t have a great body but I play one on TV,” followed the Toulmin model of argument which includes data, claims, warrants, qualifiers, rebuttals, and backing. She first began with an introduction of her topic which was self-help books by famous celebrities who have improved their fitness and have lost weight. She then built interest within the reader and made her claim within a certain feminist critical perspective that “these communication patterns are not neutral but reflective of male biases encoded in language and social practices……critical analysis of language and the social practices in which it is embedded is a vital component of social change.” Kissling began the next paragraph with a statement clarifying that she specifically wrote about the aforementioned self-help books by certain celebrities using the word “these” as her qualifier in the introductory sentence “The language of dieting and embodiment contained in these celebrity self-help books promotes anti-feminist views.” She next used direct quotes from the specified books throughout the rest of the essay as data to show the various contradictions within their books’ messages and why these points are antifeminist. Her first warrant criticized the way these books present the relationships between mind and body which was followed by her backing that “Such dualisms are artifacts of a binary world view; they promote division and deny interdependence…encouraging women to objectify and separate their selves from their bodies, these self-help books perpetuate dualistic, anti-feminist ways of thinking.” Her second warrant criticized “their passive acceptance of sexist standards for appearance.” This was backed with the idea that this creates mixed messages and misleads people with precise information about the processes these celebrities went through, not providing any disclaimer that these regimens might not work for everyone. Her third warrant criticizes the outlook that combines health, beauty and fitness into dependent ideas. She backed this arguing that equating these encourage the objectification of women’s bodies universally. Finally, Kissling gave a rebuttal informing us that there are those who believe that these women are celebrities because of their appearance but she tells us that what she believes is that “their success…clearly requires…the discipline to pursue their dreams, the intellect to manage their careers and business ventures, and at least a modicum of talent.”

  2. The 6 components of the Toulmin model of argument are used in Elizabeth Kissling’s essay, “I Don’t Have a Great Body, but I Play One on TV”. She makes her claim known in the second paragraph when she says “The language of dieting and embodiment contained in these celebrity self-help books promotes anti-feminist views”. She then goes on to explain the three themes that she thinks “work against women’s interests”. Using another element of the Toulmin model, data, Kissling quotes Cher when explaining how exercise is a battle between mind and body. She then states her warrant, after providing the data from Cher, which was “By encouraging women to objectify and separate their selves from their bodies, these self-help books perpetuate dualistic, anti-feminist ways of thinking”. As she goes on with her essay, she uses other data to support her two other arguments and analysis. In her conclusion, she states her rebuttal which was, “Although some may argue that these women earned their celebrity status because of their idealized appearance, their success in film clearly requires much more”. Through the Toulmin model of argument, Kissling explains her argument that celebrity self help books promotes anti feminist views.

  3. Elizabeth Arveda Kissling’s piece “I Don’t Have a Great Body, But I Play One On TV,” displays the six Toulmin Model components as it addresses the subject of female celebrities providing self-help books. The “claim” is presented in the second paragraph. ” This analysis focuses on the rhetorical construction of these issues in celebrity diet and fitness books, and how such advice literature addresses and positions women.” With the “qualifier” being “such advice literature,” the claim displays the statement which Kissling argues in the reading. A bit before the “claim” is presented, Kissling provides textual evidence in which will be the “data”, another component of the Toulmin Model. “Jane Fonda, for example, has written three books, Victoria Principal has written twp, and Raquel Welch, Linda Evans, Elizabeth Taylor, Stephanie Powers, Angela Lansbury, Brooke Shields, and Cher one each.” The “data” that these texts provide, will allow Kissling to prove her argument with evidence. The “warrant,” another Toulmin Model component, is stated on the second page. “Like other diet books, these celebrity texts promote contradictory images of the relationship between the mind and body.” The “warrant” is a statement which connects the claim and the data. The “claim” presented the thesis, the “data” provides the use of evidence, and the “warrant” acts as a bridge between those two components. The given quote from the reading combines the fact that the celebrity texts show the relationship of body and mind in opposed matters. The next Toulmin Model component, “backing,” is a statement that proves the “warrant” to be true. “Hence, diet books portray the body as an object that must be controlled, or even as an enemy that must be avoided.” The key word “hence,” shows that this statement is just adding onto the “warrant.” As the sixth and final Toulmin Model component, page four provides the “rebuttal.” “However, attractiveness is not only the criterion by which men evaluate women, but is a defining criterion of self-worth for women themselves.” This “rebuttal” counter-arguments a statement which indicates that the given argument is not true. The quote shows that other assumptions have been made, yet they are not completely correct. They have been counter-argued. This analysis of Kissling’s argument contained the six components of the Toulmin Model of Argument.

  4. Kissling in “I don’t Have a Great Body, But I Play One on TV: The celebrity guide to fitness and weight loss in the United States” states that celebrities are beginning to write self-help books on fitness. Kissling says “The language of dieting and embodiment contained in these celebrity self-help books promotes anti-feminist views” (Kissling 1995). In the self-help books, women are told that they must be skinny to be healthy and good looking. This causes them to lose their self-esteem because the majority of them are still having a non-skinny figure. Kissling qualified her claim by stating “the language of dieting and embodiment contained” in the self-help books promotes the anti-feminist view. This reduces the scope of her claim in order to put a limit on the claim and make it more accurate.
    She supported her claim by quoting a lot of lines from different celebrities which seems to be irony. The facts stated in those self-help books seem to be contradicting each other. There are 3 main themes of celebrity advice in her opinion which are mind/body relationships, self-esteem, and beauty as well as health, fitness and beauty.
    The warrant which Kissling used in her article – “I don’t Have a Great Body, But I Play One on TV: The celebrity guide to fitness and weight loss in the United States”, is by stating that women are given the idea that skinny as healthy and their bodies are used as a machine. They are not given a freedom to live a life that they want as opposing to feminism instead women are expected to use their bodies as a machine to achieve a slim figure. Kissling says “Presented as a tool for women’s liberation and independence, the equation of fitness, beauty, and self-esteem instead contributes to a climate of oppression by encouraging woman to participate in the objectification of their own and other bodies” (Kissling 1995). By giving women such ideology, they tend to view every other woman by their appearance and body figure. This causes them to have lower self-esteem by being ashamed of their own body.
    Kissling backed up her warrant by claiming that the body image presented by the celebrities are hard to achieve or even unattainable for most. However, skinny figure becomes an essential element for self-esteem. As a result, women who failed to meet these ideals are shamed by the text written by these celebrities.
    Kissling rebutted her claim by stating “Although some may argue that these women earned their celebrity status because of their idealized appearance, their success in film and television clearly requires much more: the discipline to pursue their dreams, the intellect to manage their careers and business ventures, and at least a modicum of talent” (Kissling 1995).

  5. Kissling identifies the six Toulmin components in her essay titled, “I don’t have a great body but I play one on tv: The celebrity guide to fitness and weight loss in the United States”. Toulmin’s argument model includes claim, data, warrant, backing, qualifier, and rebuttal. Kissling begins to discuss how self-help books are a popular way that celebrities promote weight loss and fitness advice. This includes celebrities Elizabeth Taylor and Cher. Kissling reveals her claim in the very beginning of paragraph three, stating that “the language of dieting and embodiment contained in these celebrity self-help books promotes anti-feminist views”. Kissling explains her claim using the data “three recurrent themes that work against women’s interests: celebrity fitness books present contradictory advice about the mind/body relationship, associate self-esteem with beauty, and conflate the relationships among health, fitness, and beauty”. Kissling continues to support her claim when stating her warrant “these books share themes that present disturbing messages to their targeted audience of women”. Another component of Toulmin’s model argument is backing. Backing supports her warrant and this is used when Kissling says “women must distance themselves from their bodies… keep her body under surveillance… in order to lose weight”. In the next sentence the qualifier “hence” is used to explain that “diet books portray the body as an object, or even an enemy that must be avoided”. Lastly Kissling rebutted her claim when she states, “Although some may argue that these women earned their celebrity status because of their idealized appearance, their success in film and television clearly requires much more”.

  6. One of the six components of the Toulmin model of argument that are used in Kissling piece is the claim. Kissling expressed her claim in “ I don’t Have a Great Body, But I Play One on TV: The celebrity guide to fitness and weight loss in the United States” when she talks about the “Rhetorical construction of these issues in celebrity diet and fitness books, and how such advice literature addresses and positions women.” The claim express Kissling’s concerns about the issues that’s reflecting based on the books about contains advices from the celebrity about body discussion . The data is developed when Kissling introduces the three themes, which is the fact that the books present contradictory ideas about women’s interest. The warrant was about how the purpose of the celebrity books was to help women to develop self-esteem about their body, but ends up giving them contradictory ideas about how they should keep their body skinny is the most important.The data is provided when Kissling provided evidences from the book to support her claim in the writing. The backing was a quote from Cher(1991) states “ur bodies are like engines. What happen if you pour cheap gasoline into your car engine? Doesn’t your car just fall apart?..”. The qualifier was introduced to explain that the quote refers women’s body as engine while she just finished her discussion about the importance of mind and body relationship. The rebuttal of the writing was when Kissling states “Although some may argue that these women earned their celebrity status because of their idealized appearance..” which makes readers to recognize that it’s reasonable for actresses to think this way. In their concept of thinking, skinny body was what boost up their self-esteem, but they forget to interpret that their ways may not work for everybody.

  7. The work of Elizabeth Arveda Kissling, “I Don’t Have A Great Body, But I Play One On TV” contained the six Toulmin components. One of the component, “claim”, is included in the second paragraph of Kissling’s writing. In the writing it states: “This particular genre of self-help books grows out of my personal and professional interest in women and body-consciousness and the ways in which the mind-body relationship is mediated through language.” After Kissling had introduced her thesis of her paper, she then utilized another Toulmin component, “evidence”, to present the audience with powerful reasonings. Throughout out her writing, Kissling concluded three main themes related to self-help books are physical fitness, beauty, and self esteem. She related her evidence to different celebrity writers. Data is another Toulmin component that was expressed in Kissling’s writing. Different data were used in her paper in order to strengthen her argument. According to “I Don’t Have A Great Body, But I Play One On TV”, : “ For example, Raquel Welch(1984) writes that “the mind and body are interrelated–they never stop interacting.Everything we think and feel is related to our physical form;…and physical and mental aspects of each of us are inseparable”(p.2)” This text shows Kissling had used the text evidence from another celebrity writer as data base to support her claim. The “warrant” is a tool to connect the evidence with the claim. The function of the “warrant” is to connect evidence together in order to prove the claim to be true. Kissling provided her analysis to the data, which had connected to the claim that were stated at the beginning of the paper. The qualifier element that was stated in the components of Toulmin is also included in Kissling’s writing. The qualifier is used to specify the situation described in the writing. Finally, the rebuttal in the argument occurred when Kissling rebutted: “ When the body image they recommend for women is difficult to achieve and unattainable for most, and then presented as essential to self-esteem, these texts shame women for failure to meet these ideals.” Self-help books might assist some women to acquire self-esteem, beauty, and physical fitness. But at the same time, some women may develop the thought of being disqualified or being failed when they did not achieve the ideals that were written in the self-help books.

  8. Elizabeth Arveda Kissling’s essay, “I Don’t Have a Great Body, But I Play One On T.V”, embodies the six components of the Toulmin Model of Argument: data, claim, warrant, qualifier, rebuttal, and backing. She begins her essay with discussing the use of self help books on weight loss and self-esteem, written by various celebrities to prove her claim. A claim is the statement the writer is arguing in their writing. Kissling’s claim is found at the beginning of paragraph three where she states, “The language of dieting and embodiment contained in these celebrity self help books promotes anti-feminist views.” The second part of the Toulmin model is data which is the facts or evidence used to prove the argument. Her data is found in the second sentence of the third paragraph in which she says, “The following analysis identifies three recurrent themes that work against women’s interests: celebrity fitness books present contradictory advice about the mind/body relationship, associate self-esteem with beauty, and conflate the relationships among health, fitness, and beauty.” Here she is briefly giving the reader examples of evidence that she will discuss in the rest of her essay. Also as data she repeatedly brings in examples from the self help books from the beginning of the essay and quotes directly from what the celebrities say in their books. At the end of the fourth paragraph Kissling writes, “These books also share three recurrent themes that present disturbing messages to their targeted audience of women.” Kissling uses this sentence as a warrant by creating a bridge to link her claim and the data she is displaying. Later in the essay Kissling presents a rebuttle, a counter argument to her argument. She says, “Presented as a tool for women’s liberation and independence,the equation of fitness, beauty, and self esteem instead contributes to a climate of oppression by encouraging women to participate in the objectification of their own and other bodies.” The word ‘instead’ is used as a qualifier in this sentence to limit the strength of the statement. Lastly, Kissling uses a backing to support the warrant that was previously stated. Her backing is, “In spite of their stated intentions, celebrity authors perpetuate sexist standards of beauty and destructive symbiotic relationship between self-esteem and appearance.”

  9. Kissling followed the Toulmin model of argument in her essay “I don’t have a great body but I play one on TV,” by including backing, rebuttals, claims, data, qualifiers, and warrant. She made her claim by stating “The language of dieting and embodiment contained in these celebrity self help books promotes anti-feminist views” in the beginning of the paragraph. She began the next paragraph stating, “The language of dieting and embodiment contained in these celebrity self-help books promotes anti-feminist views.” The word These was the qualifier. What I believe is she took quotes from other books to prove anti-feminism to use as the data. Her first warrant emphasized the way these books have people perceive the relationships between mind and body, paired with the backing “Such dualisms are artifacts of a binary world view; they promote division and deny interdependence…encouraging women to objectify and separate their selves from their bodies, these self-help books perpetuate dualistic, anti-feminist ways of thinking” and her second warrant mentioned “their passive acceptance of sexist standards for appearance.” The backing for this was this misleads people. Her third warrant was about the idea of the combination of health, beauty and fitness. She backed this arguing it objectifies women. Kissling’s rebuttal was people believe women are celebrities because of their looks but she argues, “their success…clearly requires…the discipline to pursue their dreams, the intellect to manage their careers and business ventures, and at least a modicum of talent.”

  10. In the article “I Don’t Have a Great Body, But I Play One On TV”, the author, Elizabeth Arveda Kissling, follows that Toulmin Model of Argument. Her claim is that self-help books written by celebrities, specifically those about weight loss and its relationship with health and beauty, are making women believe that they have to be skinny in order for them to look and feel beautiful, therefore making them feel bad about the way they look and how they would not be able to look the way the authors do. As evidence to her claim, Kissling uses different quotes from books of Jane Fonda, Rachel Welch, Victoria Principal, Linda Evans and other celebrities, those quotes both prove her point and gives credibility to Kissling’s essay. She uses those quotes to show how those authors either give their readers the right image of beauty or contradict themselves, something which seems to happen often in these books. As the rebuttal, in the conclusion part of the essay, Kissling states and makes clear that although the looks of the authors of those self-help books hav helped them with their fame, we cannot forget about the discipline, hard work that they have had to do to get to where they are now.

  11. According to the article “I Don’t Have a Great Body, But I Play One On TV”, by Elizabeth Arvada Kissling. Was including embodies the six components of the Toulmin Model of Argument: data, claim, warrant, qualifier, rebuttal, and backing. From the article Kissling have identified that there have lots American celebrities were care about their body builds, especially American women they had even writes self-help books for remain a popular and accessible forum through which celebrities dispense weight loss and fitness advice. But also from the other way the self-help books are kind of anti-feminism. Because some reasons there have some thinking from those self-help books was writing about “As a woman you need learning to control your self’s body shape.” Which effect that some women doesn’t have confident about their bodies, cause according to the feminism women should be confident about themselves whatever how they look. The second claim from the self-help books that Kissling was talking about is that “The relationship between looks and self-esteem is further complicated by the conflation of beauty, healthy, and fitness in these texts. Beauty is achieved through health and physical fitness; mental and physical health come from beauty.” which she was agree whit their celebrity’s opinions for the warrants she have used is “Raquel Welch (1984) proclaims that ‘glowing healthy is the best beauty treatment’ “(P.259). For the third claim Kissling talking about is that “Self-esteem and beauty”, she said “These texts are also anti-feminist in their passive acceptance of sexist standards for appearance.” for the evidence are most likely is urge women to trade on their looks. She has point out that there have a lot diets books were writs about that women bodies Wight is importance of looks in defining women’s value. I think the author Kissling was wanting to be trying to tell us for the celebrity we shouldn’t only put our focus on how they look from the outlooks, maybe because they are public figures for some how they need to care about their body builds. But we cannot put our eye light at just one place, we should see their success in their careers and business ventures, also have, their talents.

  12. In the article titled “I Don’t Have A Great Body, But I Play One On TV” by Elizabeth Arveda Kissling, it utilizes the Toulmin model of argument which includes data, claims, warrants, qualifiers, rebuttals, and backing. This article explains how celebrities are using self-help books to encourage weight loss and advice on fitness. She first begins by stating the data of the celebrities that have made these books in her first paragraph. She then goes on to state her claim in her introduction which states that “ This analysis focuses on the rhetorical construction of these issues in celebrity diet and fitness books, and how such advice literature addresses and positions women”. Next, she warrants her claim by stating how “ A feminist critical perspective asserts that these communication patterns are not neutral but reflective of male biases encoded in language and social practices”. This shows that she believes that these books are made so that a woman can feel like she is appealing to the male eye. In addition she qualifies this statement by stating her thesis, saying “ The language of embodiment contained in these celebrity self-help books promotes anti- feminist views.” This means that these books are mainly directed towards women and don’t believe in the same thing for men. Her rebuttal comes later on in the article, stating that “These texts are also anti- feminist in their passive acceptance of sexist standards for appearance”. Which shows that there is a standard for women to meet on the way that they look but there isn’t really a standard for men. They expect women to be “perfect” just for the public eye. She backs this statement by expressing that “ The authors advice stems directly from their conformity to, not their challenge of, prevailing attitudes about the importance of looks in defining women’s value”. Which helps her rebuttal because it further proves how the authors of this book are contributing to the anti-feminist population.

  13. Elizabeth A. Kissling uses six components of the Toulmin model of argument in her essay “I don’t have a great body, but I play one on TV”. Elizabeth’s claim is stated in the second paragraph of the first page. The claim was that she focused “on The rhetorical construction of issues in celebrity diet, and fitness books, and how such advice literature addresses and positions women”. The claim is backed up by data which Elizabeth depicts by naming authors whom have written these self-help books. Elizabeth quotes these authors in order to prove her argument. The warrant stated in this piece is that “celebrity fitness books present contradictory advice about the mind/body relationship, associate self-esteem with beauty, and conflate the relationships among health, fitness, and beauty”. The warrant is then supported by the backing. An example of a backing is: Rachel Welch states in her article that “the physical and mental aspects of each of us are inseparable; however, a few pages later, she goes on to advise her readers to separate mind from body”. The backing helps support the warrant. In the sentence “hence, diet books portray the body as an object that must be controlled, or even as an enemy that must be avoided”, Hence is the qualifier, because it limits the strength of the argument. The rebuttal is that even though these women gained their celebrity status because of their appearance, they still worked hard to get where they are.

  14. In Kissling’s article “I Don’t Have a Good Body but I Play One On TV”, she discusses the contradicting topic that there is a strong connection between the media and the way women perceive the standard beauty. Using the Toulmin Model of Argument, a model by Stephen Toulmin that breaks down an argument by means to measure the quality of it, one could annotate Kissling’s article to decipher the true nature of her argument. Kissling uses all 6 components to create her strongly opinionated article about women’s motives for maintaining their body size: data, claim, warrants, qualifiers, rebuttals, and backing. Kissling’s claim is that “The language of dieting and embodiment contained in these celebrity self-help books promote anti-feminist views.” (Kissling 551) Toulmin defines a claim as a statement that is being argued. She then transitions from her claim to data to support her claim by using what Toulmin calls a warrant. “These books also share three recurrent themes that present disturbing messages to their targeted audience of women.”This statement is used as the bridge for Kissling to switch from discussing her claim to discussing the how’s and why’s in these fitness books. Her transitions from topic to topic; however, are placed in subtitles. The article is loaded with data to support her claim. Data such as the quotations from celebrities who have written diet books are used almost immediately. Kissling disagrees with Carole Spitzack’s statement that “women must distance themselves from their bodies to recognize their bodies as deviant” and provides evidence that most fitness trainers contradict themselves because there there is no true separation of the mind from the body. Both must coexist in order for the process of losing weight to be achievable. She quotes Raquel Welch”the mind and body are interrelated- they never stop interacting” and also her contradicting statement that “those bumps and bulges aren’t you anyway- they’re just excess baggage that you’re about to unload”. Kissling also rebuttals her argument towards to the end of her article to mention that “these women earned their celebrity status because of their idealized appearance” but continues to strengthen her argument by then stating that women “confirm their vulnerability to the self-esteem=beauty=slenderness=health equation that victimizes many other women in the US”. The backing of the article is found in the last parts of Kissling’s argument. The entire portion in which she speaks about “Self Esteem and Beauty” is an example of a backing. Within her backing she uses qualifiers that limit the strength of the argument. She uses words such as “most” or “many” to emphasize the fact that the claim she is making has flexibility.

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